deathandmysticism:

Monk praying in the Catacombs of Rome, 1897

deathandmysticism:

Monk praying in the Catacombs of Rome, 1897

(Source: ellamorte)

This guy is all, “Let’s go SKULL SHOPPING!”
demonagerie:

Trogen, Kantonsbibliothek Appenzell Ausserrhoden, CM Ms. 13, f. 104r. Johann von Schwarzenberg: Memorial der Tugendt. c.1530/40. Death and the bone house.

This guy is all, “Let’s go SKULL SHOPPING!”

demonagerie:

Trogen, Kantonsbibliothek Appenzell Ausserrhoden, CM Ms. 13, f. 104r. Johann von Schwarzenberg: Memorial der Tugendt. c.1530/40. Death and the bone house.

(via centuriespast)

kittenmeats:

“Kostnice” (1970) - Jan Švankmajer

kittenmeats:

“Kostnice” (1970) - Jan Švankmajer

(via vintagegal)

legrandcirque:

Felix Nadar, Catacombes de Paris, 1861.

legrandcirque:

Felix Nadar, Catacombes de Paris, 1861.

The Book of Face

<Self Promotion>

The Ossuary now has its very own baby Facebook page, and the only person who likes it so far is me.

Come join me; I’d love to hear from you!

</Self Promotion>

centuriespast:

ossuary / human skeletal remains / torpedo jar
Excavated/Findspot Bushire, cemetery 3 miles to the east of the walls of Bushire, South Iran3rdC-7thC
The British Museum

centuriespast:

ossuary / human skeletal remains / torpedo jar

Excavated/Findspot Bushire, cemetery 3 miles to the east of the walls of Bushire, South Iran
3rdC-7thC

The British Museum

ouroborosscream:

 Nadar, Catacombs of Paris, Crypt 8, 1861/62

ouroborosscream:

 Nadar, Catacombs of Paris, Crypt 8, 1861/62

regardintemporel:

Tazio Secchiaroli  - Skulls, 1953

regardintemporel:

Tazio Secchiaroli  - Skulls, 1953

(via holdthisphoto)

Per voto by Incognita Nom de Plume on Flickr.

Skulls in the Fontanelle Cemetery Caves, Naples. Italy

Per voto by Incognita Nom de Plume on Flickr.

Skulls in the Fontanelle Cemetery Caves, Naples. Italy

If you thought that Sedlec was the only ossuary worth knowing about in the Czech Republic, you&#8217;d be extremely wrong. I was wrong, too. Until Atlas Obscura&#8217;s post about the Brno Ossuary showed up in my Facebook feed last week.
Turns out there&#8217;s a new (old) ossuary on the map: one of the largest in Europe, second only to the Parisian catacombs. In 2001, archaeologists rediscovered this forgotten trove of bones (about 50,000 skeletons&#8217; worth), which were once neatly stacked but at some point along the way were jumbled by a muddy flood.
From the article:

The bones thought to be from the 1600 and 1700s, are believed to have been dug up from an old cemetery to make space for more burials, as in most of the ossuaries and catacombs in Europe. [&#8230;] It is clear that many of the people died of various disease which can be seen in the coloration of the bones themselves. Though all the bones are tinted yellow &#8212; having never been exposed to sunlight &#8212; the extra yellow ones likely died of cholera, while the red tinted bones probably died from the plague.

Sadly, the site isn&#8217;t open to the public, but will be in the future. There&#8217;s still some health risk, as the bones haven&#8217;t yet been sanitized and could contain harmful bacteria as a result of the flooding conditions. 
Image Source: Kirk on Wikimedia Commons.

If you thought that Sedlec was the only ossuary worth knowing about in the Czech Republic, you’d be extremely wrong. I was wrong, too. Until Atlas Obscura’s post about the Brno Ossuary showed up in my Facebook feed last week.

Turns out there’s a new (old) ossuary on the map: one of the largest in Europe, second only to the Parisian catacombs. In 2001, archaeologists rediscovered this forgotten trove of bones (about 50,000 skeletons’ worth), which were once neatly stacked but at some point along the way were jumbled by a muddy flood.

From the article:

The bones thought to be from the 1600 and 1700s, are believed to have been dug up from an old cemetery to make space for more burials, as in most of the ossuaries and catacombs in Europe. […] It is clear that many of the people died of various disease which can be seen in the coloration of the bones themselves. Though all the bones are tinted yellow — having never been exposed to sunlight — the extra yellow ones likely died of cholera, while the red tinted bones probably died from the plague.

Sadly, the site isn’t open to the public, but will be in the future. There’s still some health risk, as the bones haven’t yet been sanitized and could contain harmful bacteria as a result of the flooding conditions. 

Image Source: Kirk on Wikimedia Commons.

xmorbidcuriosityx:

After the recent discovery of a prehistoric charnel house in Orkney, Scotland, Katy Meyers of Bones Don’t Lie writes about the nature and purpose of charnel houses through time and across different cultures. Click the photo for the article!
Image: Charnel house in crypt of St. Brides, London via Empire de la Mort - worth checking out for the *stunning* photographs!

xmorbidcuriosityx:

After the recent discovery of a prehistoric charnel house in Orkney, Scotland, Katy Meyers of Bones Don’t Lie writes about the nature and purpose of charnel houses through time and across different cultures. Click the photo for the article!

Image: Charnel house in crypt of St. Brides, London via Empire de la Mort - worth checking out for the *stunning* photographs!

rosary by Incognita Nom de Plume on Flickr:

Votive skull, Fontenelle Cemetery Caves, Naples, Italy

I&#8217;ve posted about this site before, but you can also read more (and see pictures) in Atlas Obscura&#8217;s article:

Like many ossuaries in Europe, the Cimitero Fontanelle began as an secondary burial ground when the church yards and crypts began to overflow. Unlike other ossuaries, the skulls of the anonymous dead were lovingly cared for, named, and then asked for prophesies of winning lotto numbers.

rosary by Incognita Nom de Plume on Flickr:

Votive skull, Fontenelle Cemetery Caves, Naples, Italy

I’ve posted about this site before, but you can also read more (and see pictures) in Atlas Obscura’s article:

Like many ossuaries in Europe, the Cimitero Fontanelle began as an secondary burial ground when the church yards and crypts began to overflow. Unlike other ossuaries, the skulls of the anonymous dead were lovingly cared for, named, and then asked for prophesies of winning lotto numbers.

Another view of the Capela dos Ossos in Évora, Portugal. Source: Wikipedia.

Another view of the Capela dos Ossos in Évora, Portugal. Source: Wikipedia.

 
Inscription above the entrance to the Capela dos Ossos (Bone Chapel) in Évora, Portugal.  Translation: “We bones, lying here bare, are awaiting yours.&#8221;

Inscription above the entrance to the Capela dos Ossos (Bone Chapel) in Évora, Portugal.  Translation: “We bones, lying here bare, are awaiting yours.”

Skeletons, mummies, bog bodies, exhumations. The dead, and what happens to them.

About | Archive

Categories:
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Feats of Preservation
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