deathandmysticism:

Monk praying in the Catacombs of Rome, 1897

deathandmysticism:

Monk praying in the Catacombs of Rome, 1897

blackpaint20:

Skull of King Robert I (the Bruce)
The rosewood box with brass inlay holds a plaster cast of the skull of King Robert I (1306-1329). Robert Bruce, Earl of Carrick, was originally a supporter of the English King, Edward I, before changing his allegiance to the Scots. After murdering his close rival, John Comyn, in 1306, he claimed the Scottish throne as the great-great-grandson of David I and, despite opposition, he was crowned at Scone. To achieve independence for Scotland, at the same time as fighting his Scottish enemies, he proceeded to remove the English from Scottish castles and garrisons, until by 1314 only Stirling held out. The ensuing battle at Bannockburn led to Bruce’s decisive victory against the English. Bruce’s army continued to harass the English until Edward III, in 1328, was forced to acknowledge his sovereignty and his heirs as kings of Scotland.
After his death in 1329 the body of Robert I was interred at Dunfermline Abbey where it lay until the Abbey’s Great Tower collapsed in 1818. The site was cleared prior to rebuilding and many tombs were uncovered, including that of Bruce, whose tomb was opened. His remains were examined and measured and a plaster cast of the skull was made by William Scoular. Bruce’s body was re-interred at Dunfermline Abbey in 1819 amid great scenes of national fervour.
The stand is incribed: Cast in plaster by Wm Scouler 1819. Interred 1329. Re-interred 1819.
Quoted from source

blackpaint20:

Skull of King Robert I (the Bruce)

The rosewood box with brass inlay holds a plaster cast of the skull of King Robert I (1306-1329). Robert Bruce, Earl of Carrick, was originally a supporter of the English King, Edward I, before changing his allegiance to the Scots. After murdering his close rival, John Comyn, in 1306, he claimed the Scottish throne as the great-great-grandson of David I and, despite opposition, he was crowned at Scone. To achieve independence for Scotland, at the same time as fighting his Scottish enemies, he proceeded to remove the English from Scottish castles and garrisons, until by 1314 only Stirling held out. The ensuing battle at Bannockburn led to Bruce’s decisive victory against the English. Bruce’s army continued to harass the English until Edward III, in 1328, was forced to acknowledge his sovereignty and his heirs as kings of Scotland.

After his death in 1329 the body of Robert I was interred at Dunfermline Abbey where it lay until the Abbey’s Great Tower collapsed in 1818. The site was cleared prior to rebuilding and many tombs were uncovered, including that of Bruce, whose tomb was opened. His remains were examined and measured and a plaster cast of the skull was made by William Scoular. Bruce’s body was re-interred at Dunfermline Abbey in 1819 amid great scenes of national fervour.

The stand is incribed: Cast in plaster by Wm Scouler 1819. Interred 1329. Re-interred 1819.

Quoted from source

(via valdanderthal)

Boxwood statuette of Death holding an egg-timer.German, 18th century; from the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Boxwood statuette of Death holding an egg-timer.

German, 18th century; from the Victoria and Albert Museum.


None can narrate that strife in the pines,A seal is on it — Sabaean lore!Obscure as the wood, the entangled rhymeBut hints at the maze of war —Vivid glimpses or livid through peopled gloom, And fires which creep and char —A riddle of death, of which the slainSole solvers are.

—Herman Melville, “The Armies of the Wilderness” 
Image: Skulls remaining on the field and trees destroyed at the Battle of the Wilderness, 1864, Virginia. Source: Wikipedia.

None can narrate that strife in the pines,
A seal is on it — Sabaean lore!
Obscure as the wood, the entangled rhyme
But hints at the maze of war —
Vivid glimpses or livid through peopled gloom,
And fires which creep and char —
A riddle of death, of which the slain
Sole solvers are.

Herman Melville, “The Armies of the Wilderness” 

Image: Skulls remaining on the field and trees destroyed at the Battle of the Wilderness, 1864, Virginia. Source: Wikipedia.

This must be the cover of some punk or hardcore 7”, somewhere.
Cover of LIFE magazine, October 31, 1960. Photo by George Silk. Source: LIFE Photo Archive, hosted by Google.

This must be the cover of some punk or hardcore 7”, somewhere.

Cover of LIFE magazine, October 31, 1960. Photo by George Silk. Source: LIFE Photo Archive, hosted by Google.

Illustration by Angelo Jank in the German art magazine Jugend, No. 13, 1897: “Der Tod im Baum.”

Illustration by Angelo Jank in the German art magazine Jugend, No. 13, 1897: “Der Tod im Baum.”

(Source: sassysadprincess, via theblurofserenity)

ellamorte:

In Colon Cemetery in Havana, Cuba is the site of the celebrated ‘boneyard’. A single grave in the cemetery cost $10 in rent for five years. At the end of the five years, if the remains were not claimed, the bones were thrown into the boneyard, (sometimes known as ‘bone pile’) by the cemetery authorities.

ellamorte:

In Colon Cemetery in Havana, Cuba is the site of the celebrated ‘boneyard’. A single grave in the cemetery cost $10 in rent for five years. At the end of the five years, if the remains were not claimed, the bones were thrown into the boneyard, (sometimes known as ‘bone pile’) by the cemetery authorities.

First World War-era cartoon by Dutch cartoonist Louis Raemaekers.
day-without-sun:

To Your Health, Civilization.

First World War-era cartoon by Dutch cartoonist Louis Raemaekers.

day-without-sun:

To Your Health, Civilization.

(via nocnitsa)

Too bad my birthday was last week. Next year, right?
wnycradiolab:

Have you always wanted to sit inside a skull?  Well, uh, here you go, weirdo.

Too bad my birthday was last week. Next year, right?

wnycradiolab:

Have you always wanted to sit inside a skull?  Well, uh, here you go, weirdo.

(Source: jasonhoodrich)

nevver:

J’accuse!
Image: A post-medieval skull with a coin in each eye orbit, excavated from Bethnal Green, London. Copyright AOC Archaeology.
Via Bones Don’t Lie: Coin in the Mouth or Shoe in the Coffin.
Morbid Anatomy: Saint Victoria and Saint Wittoria in Rome, or The Difficulties of Researching Catholic Artifacts

I am dying to know: Are those bones embedded in the waxworks?

Images: Relics (?) of Saint Vittoria, or Victoria in the church of Santa Maria della Vittoria, Rome, by Morbid Anatomy.

(Source: ellamorte)

Third eye?

Third eye?

(Source: bigirondoor, via anaestheticroom)

Skeletons, mummies, bog bodies, exhumations. The dead, and what happens to them.

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